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Monologues for men

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AGAMEMNON Essay

A monologue from the play by Aeschylus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramas of Aeschylus. Trans. Anna Swanwick. London: George Bell and Sons, 1907. AEGISTHOS: Hail, joyous light of justice-bearing day!At length I can aver that God’s supernal,Judges of men, look down on earthly woes,Beholding, in the Erinyes’ woven robes,This man, thus prostrate,…

AJAX Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Dramas. Sophocles. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1906. AJAX: Ah, who would have supposed it possibleThe name I bear should ever be attunedTo these misfortunes! Doubly, trebly nowMay I lament; so sore bested am I;Whose father in Ida bore the palm onceFrom…

ALCESTIS Essay

A monologue from the play by Euripides NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Plays of Euripides in English, vol. ii. Trans. Shelley Dean Milman. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1922. ADMETUS: My friends, I deem the fortune of my wifeHappier than mine, though otherwise it seems;For never more shall sorrow touch her breast,And she…

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ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare PAROLLES: It is not politic in the commonwealth of nature to preserve virginity. Loss of virginity is rational increase, and there was never virgin got till virginity was first lost. That you were made of is metal to make virgins. Virginity by being once lost may be…

AMPHITRYON Essay

A monologue from the play by Moliere NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramatic Works of Moliere, Vol. II. Ed. Charles Heron Wall. London: George Bell & Sons, 1898. SOSIA: Who goes there? My fear increases every minute! Gentlemen, you see in me a friend of the whole world. Ah! what boldness in me…

ANTIGONE Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Greek Dramas. Ed. Bernadotte Perrin. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1904. CREON: Sirs, the vessel of our state, after being tossed on wild waves, hath once more been safely steadied by the gods: and ye, out of all the folk, have…

ANTIGONE Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Greek Dramas. Ed. Bernadotte Perrin. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1904. GUARD: My liege, I will not say that I come breathless from speed, or that I have plied a nimble foot; for often did my thoughts make me pause, and…

ANTIGONE Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Greek Dramas. Ed. Bernadotte Perrin. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1904. CREON: Yea, this, my son, should by thy heart’s fixed law–in all things to obey thy father’s will. ‘Tis for this that men pray to see dutiful children grow up…

ANTIGONE Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Greek Dramas. Ed. Bernadotte Perrin. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1904. HAEMON: Father, the gods implant reason in men, the highest of all things that we call our own. Not mine the skill–far from me be the quest!–to say wherein thou…

ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare ANTONY: All is lost!This foul Egyptian hath betrayed me:My fleet hath yielded to the foe, and yonderThey cast their caps up and carouse togetherLike friends long lost. Triple-turned whore! ’tis thouHas sold me to this novice, and my heartMakes only wars on thee. Bid them all fly;For…

AS YOU LIKE IT Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare JAQUES: All the world’s a stage,And all the men and women merely players;They have their exits and their entrances,And one man in his time plays many parts,His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms.Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchelAnd…

THE BACCHAE Essay

A monologue from the play by Euripides NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Plays of Euripides in English, vol. ii. Trans. Shelley Dean Milman. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1922. TIRESIAS: ‘Tis easy to be eloquent, for himThat’s skilled in speech, and hath a stirring theme.Thou hast the flowing tongue as of a wise…

BAJAZET Essay

A monologue from the play by Jean Racine NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramatic Works of Jean Racine. Trans. Robert Bruce Boswell. London: George Bell and Sons, 1911. ACHMET: Would’st thou have me learnNow at my age the worthless lore of love?And shall a heart that years of toil have harden’dBlindly submit to…

CAIN Essay

A monologue from the play by Lord Byron NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Lord Byron: Six Plays. Lord Byron. Los Angeles: Black Box Press, 2007. LUCIFER: A superior?! Superior?!No! By heaven, which heHolds, and the abyss, and the immensityOf worlds and life, which I hold with him—No!I have a Victor—true; but no superior.Homage he…

CAIN Essay

A monologue from the play by Lord Byron NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Lord Byron: Six Plays. Lord Byron. Los Angeles: Black Box Press, 2007. CAIN: And this is Life? — Toil!And wherefore should I toil? — becauseMy father could not keep his place in Eden?What had I done in this? — I was…

CASINA Essay

A monologue from the play by Titus Maccius Plautus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Plautus, vol. II. Trans. Paul Nixon. London: William Heinemann, 1917. OLYMPIO: What’ll I do to you? First of all, I’ll make you torch-bearer to this bride of mine. After that you’ll be the same worthless good-for-nothing as always; and subsequently…

CASINA Essay

A monologue from the play by Titus Maccius Plautus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Plautus, vol. II. Trans. Paul Nixon. London: William Heinemann, 1917. LYSIDAMUS: Ah, yes, yes, there’s nothing in the world like love, no bloom like its bloom; not a thing can you mention that has more flavour and more savour. Upon…

THE CASKET COMEDY Essay

A monologue from the play by Titus Maccius Plautus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Plautus, vol. II. Trans. Paul Nixon. London: William Heinemann, 1917. ALCESIMARCHUS: I do believe it was Love that first devised the torturer’s profession here on earth. It’s my own experience–no need to look further–that makes me think so, for in…

THE CID Essay

A monologue from the play by Pierre Corneille NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Cid. Trans. Roscoe Mongan. New York: Hinds & Noble, 1896. DON RODRIGO: Pierced even to the depth by a blow unexpected as well as deadly, pitiable avenger of a just quarrel and unfortunate object of an unjust severity, I remain…

THE CLOUDS Essay

A monologue from the play by Aristophanes NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Aristophanes: The Eleven Comedies. Trans. Anonymous. London: The Athenian Society, 1922. STREPSIADES: Great gods! will these nights never end? will daylight never come? I heard the cock crow long ago and my slaves are snoring still! Ah! ’twas not so formerly. Curses…

CORIOLANUS Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare MENENIUS: I am known to be a humorous patrician, and one that loves a cup of hot wine with not a drop of allaying Tiber in’t; said to be something imperfect in favoring the first complaint; hasty and tinder-like upon too trivial motion; one that converses more…

CORIOLANUS Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare CORIOLANUS: My name is Caius Marcius, who hath doneTo thee particularly and to all the VolscesGreat hurt and mischief; thereto witness mayMy surname, Coriolanus. The painful service,The extreme dangers, and the drops of bloodShed for my thankless country are requitedBut with that surname — a good memory,And…

Agamemnon monologue from the play by Aeschylus Essay

A monologue from the play by Aeschylus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramas of Aeschylus. Trans. Anna Swanwick. London: George Bell and Sons, 1907. AEGISTHOS: Hail, joyous light of justice-bearing day! At length I can aver that God\’s supernal, Judges of men, look down on earthly woes, Beholding, in the Erinyes\’ woven robes,…

THE CYCLOPS Essay

A monologue from the play by Euripides NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Plays of Euripides in English, vol. i. Trans. Shelley Dean Milman. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1920. ULYSSES: Soon as we came into this craggy place,Kindling a fire, he cast on the broad hearthThe knotty limbs of an enormous oak,Three wagon-loads…

DIALOGUES OF THE DEAD Essay

A monologue from the dialogues of Lucian NOTE: This monologue is reprinted with the author’s permission. All inquiries should be directed to the author at: [email protected] HANNIBAL: I think we can all agree that the highest praise is due to those who have fought their way to greatness from obscurity—who have pulled themselves up by…

DIALOGUES OF THE GODS Essay

A monologue from the dialogues of Lucian NOTE: This monologue is reprinted with the author’s permission. All inquiries should be directed to the author at: [email protected] ZEUS: You’re a meddling, mean-spirited old man, Eros, and you won’t get any mercy from me just because you have no beard or white hair! You were about to…

DIALOGUES OF THE GODS Essay

A monologue from the dialogues of Lucian NOTE: This monologue is reprinted with the author’s permission. All inquiries should be directed to the author at: [email protected] HERMES: It isn’t fair! Why do I have to be the whipping boy? I’m a God just like the rest of them, but it’s always “Hermes! Do this! Hermes!…

DOCTOR FAUSTUS Essay

A monologue from the play by Christopher Marlowe NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Masterpieces of the English Drama. Ed. William Lyon Phelps. New York: American Book Company, 1912. FAUSTUS: Ah, Faustus.Now hast thou but one bare hour to live,And then thou must be damn’d perpetually!Stand still, you ever-moving spheres of heaven,That time may cease,…

THE DOCTOR IN SPITE OF HIMSELF Essay

A monologue from the play by Moliere NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramatic Works of Moliere, Vol. II. Ed. Charles Heron Wall. London: George Bell & Sons, 1898. SGANARELLE: No, I tell you; they made a doctor of me in spite of myself. I had never dreamt of being so learned as that,…

DON JUAN Essay

A monologue from the play by Moliere NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramatic Works of Moliere, Vol. II. Ed. Charles Heron Wall. London: George Bell & Sons, 1898. DON JUAN: What! would you have a man bind himself to the first girl he falls in love with, say farewell to the world for…

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A monologue (from the Greek mono – one, the only, and losso – word) is a long, inwardly homogeneous and consistent statement, which belongs to one hero and does not require an immediate answer. The monologue is a relatively independent component of the composition of an artistic work; therefore, it can be used both in the presence of listeners and without them. He expresses thoughts, experiences, and feelings of the hero and is an important means of revealing his psychology, his inner world, spiritual state.

Monologues for men are usually in the form of confession (the hero reconsiders his life, deeds; he is an important moment in the self-awareness of the character, his self-esteem). The speaker refers directly to the target audience. The dramatic monologues for men are usually pronounced by the hero, who intends to share an unpleasant experience or endeavors to describe the dramatic situation.

These speeches move the audience to tears. Opposite to this kind is comedic monologues for men. They are characterized by the dynamism of the language used. They are usually informal, sometimes even rude. Many stylistic means of speech are implemented to make it more colorful and attract the attention of the audience.

No matter what type of the contemporary monologues for men it is, it is always characterized by an increased subjectivity of the narrative, emphasized emotionality and expressiveness of the means. It can have either didactic or inspirational. Several skills are needed for the successful monologue. They include:

  • ability to draw attention to his story;
  • ability to plan a story and start it;
  • ability to tell history in chronological order;
  • the ability to tell stories in a non-chronological order;
  • opportunity to give the story a mysterious character or introduce detective elements into it;
  • the ability to decorate the story, make it more alive;
  • the ability to express their point of view and give an assessment of the events that occur.

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