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Monologues

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AGAMEMNON Essay

A monologue from the play by Aeschylus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramas of Aeschylus. Trans. Anna Swanwick. London: George Bell and Sons, 1907. CLYTEMNESTRA: Men of our city, Argive elders here,I shame not in your presence to avowMy wifely temper; bashful Fear in timeFrom mortals dieth: not by others taught,But from myself,…

AGAMEMNON Essay

A monologue from the play by Aeschylus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramas of Aeschylus. Trans. Anna Swanwick. London: George Bell and Sons, 1907. AEGISTHOS: Hail, joyous light of justice-bearing day!At length I can aver that God’s supernal,Judges of men, look down on earthly woes,Beholding, in the Erinyes’ woven robes,This man, thus prostrate,…

AGAMEMNON Essay

A monologue from the play by Aeschylus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramas of Aeschylus. Trans. Anna Swanwick. London: George Bell and Sons, 1907. CLYTEMNESTRA: Though much to suit the times before was said,It shames me not the opposite to speak:For, plotting against foes,–our seeming friends,–How else contrive with Ruin’s wily snare,Too high…

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AJAX Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Dramas. Sophocles. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1906. AJAX: Ah, who would have supposed it possibleThe name I bear should ever be attunedTo these misfortunes! Doubly, trebly nowMay I lament; so sore bested am I;Whose father in Ida bore the palm onceFrom…

AGAMEMNON Essay

A monologue from the play by Seneca NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Seneca’s Tragedy, v. ii. Trans. Frank Justus Miller. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 1917. CASSANDRA: Where am I? Fled is the kindly light, deep darkness blinds my eyes, and the sky, buried in gloom, is hidden away. But see! with double sun…

ALCESTIS Essay

A monologue from the play by Euripides NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Plays of Euripides in English, vol. ii. Trans. Shelley Dean Milman. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1922. ADMETUS: My friends, I deem the fortune of my wifeHappier than mine, though otherwise it seems;For never more shall sorrow touch her breast,And she…

AJAX Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Dramas. Sophocles. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1906. TECMESSA: You shall hear all that passed,Being sharers in the event. At dead of night,When the evening campfires no longer blazed,He grasped his two-edged weapon, and seemed bentTo sally upon some errand, objectless.I, in…

AJAX Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Dramas. Sophocles. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1906. TECMESSA: O my lord Ajax, in the ills of menThere is none sorer than Necessity.I was the offspring of a sire free-born,Strong in his wealth, no Phrygian more than he;And now, I am a…

ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare PAROLLES: It is not politic in the commonwealth of nature to preserve virginity. Loss of virginity is rational increase, and there was never virgin got till virginity was first lost. That you were made of is metal to make virgins. Virginity by being once lost may be…

AMPHITRYON Essay

A monologue from the play by Moliere NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramatic Works of Moliere, Vol. II. Ed. Charles Heron Wall. London: George Bell & Sons, 1898. SOSIA: Who goes there? My fear increases every minute! Gentlemen, you see in me a friend of the whole world. Ah! what boldness in me…

ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare HELENA: I confessHere on my knee before high heaven and you,That before you, and next unto high heaven,I love your son.My friends were poor but honest; so’s my love.Be not offended, for it hurts not himThat he is loved of me. I follow him notBy any token…

ANTIGONE Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Greek Dramas. Ed. Bernadotte Perrin. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1904. ANTIGONE: Tomb, bridal chamber, eternal prison in the caverned rock, whither I go to find mine own, those many who have perished, and whom Persephone hath received among the dead!…

ANTIGONE Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Greek Dramas. Ed. Bernadotte Perrin. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1904. CREON: Sirs, the vessel of our state, after being tossed on wild waves, hath once more been safely steadied by the gods: and ye, out of all the folk, have…

AS YOU LIKE IT Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare PHEBE: I would not by thy executioner.I fly thee, for I would not injure thee.Thou tell’st me there is murder in mine eye:‘Tis pretty, sure, and very probableThat eyes, that are the frail’st and softest things,Who shut their coward gates on atomies,Should be called tyrants, butchers, murderers.Now…

ANTIGONE Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Greek Dramas. Ed. Bernadotte Perrin. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1904. GUARD: My liege, I will not say that I come breathless from speed, or that I have plied a nimble foot; for often did my thoughts make me pause, and…

AS YOU LIKE IT Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare PHEBE: Think not I love him, though I ask for him;‘Tis but a peevish boy; yet he talks well.But what care I for words? Yet words do wellWhen he that speaks them pleases those that hear.It is a pretty youth; not very pretty;But sure he’s proud; and…

ANTIGONE Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Greek Dramas. Ed. Bernadotte Perrin. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1904. CREON: Yea, this, my son, should by thy heart’s fixed law–in all things to obey thy father’s will. ‘Tis for this that men pray to see dutiful children grow up…

ATHALIAH Essay

A monologue from the play by Jean Racine NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramatic Works of Jean Racine. Trans. Robert Bruce Boswell. London: George Bell and Sons, 1911. ATHALIAH: While thus disturb’d, before me roseThe vision of a boy in shining robe,Such as the Hebrew priests are wont to wear.My drooping spirits at…

ANTIGONE Essay

A monologue from the play by Sophocles NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Greek Dramas. Ed. Bernadotte Perrin. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1904. HAEMON: Father, the gods implant reason in men, the highest of all things that we call our own. Not mine the skill–far from me be the quest!–to say wherein thou…

BAJAZET Essay

A monologue from the play by Jean Racine NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramatic Works of Jean Racine. Trans. Robert Bruce Boswell. London: George Bell and Sons, 1911. ROXANA: I know ’tis not the custom of our sultans,Who in their pride stoop not to such constraints,Nor hold the laws of marriage made for…

ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare ANTONY: All is lost!This foul Egyptian hath betrayed me:My fleet hath yielded to the foe, and yonderThey cast their caps up and carouse togetherLike friends long lost. Triple-turned whore! ’tis thouHas sold me to this novice, and my heartMakes only wars on thee. Bid them all fly;For…

AS YOU LIKE IT Essay

A monologue from the play by William Shakespeare JAQUES: All the world’s a stage,And all the men and women merely players;They have their exits and their entrances,And one man in his time plays many parts,His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms.Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchelAnd…

BEWARE OF SMOOTH WATER Essay

A monologue from the play by Pedro Calderon de la Barca NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Eight Dramas of Calderon. Trans. Edward Fitzgerald. London: Macmillan & Co., 1906. DONNA CLARA: Not to spareYour father even, Eugenia! For shame!‘Tis time to tie your roving tongue indeed.Consider, too, we are not in the country,Where tongue and…

THE BACCHAE Essay

A monologue from the play by Euripides NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Plays of Euripides in English, vol. ii. Trans. Shelley Dean Milman. London: J.M. Dent & Sons, 1922. TIRESIAS: ‘Tis easy to be eloquent, for himThat’s skilled in speech, and hath a stirring theme.Thou hast the flowing tongue as of a wise…

CAIN Essay

A monologue from the play by Lord Byron NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Lord Byron: Six Plays. Lord Byron. Los Angeles: Black Box Press, 2007. ADAH: ‘Twere better that he never had been born?Oh, do not say so! Where were then the joys,The mother’s joys of watching, nourishing,And loving him? Soft! he awakes. Sweet…

CAIN Essay

A monologue from the play by Lord Byron NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Lord Byron: Six Plays. Lord Byron. Los Angeles: Black Box Press, 2007. EVE: Hear, Jehovah!May the eternal Serpent’s curse be on him!For he was fitter for his seed than ours.May all his days be desolate!He hath left thee no brother, Adah—Zillah…

BAJAZET Essay

A monologue from the play by Jean Racine NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramatic Works of Jean Racine. Trans. Robert Bruce Boswell. London: George Bell and Sons, 1911. ACHMET: Would’st thou have me learnNow at my age the worthless lore of love?And shall a heart that years of toil have harden’dBlindly submit to…

THE CASKET COMEDY Essay

A monologue from the play by Titus Maccius Plautus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Plautus, vol. II. Trans. Paul Nixon. London: William Heinemann, 1917. HALISCA: If heaven doesn’t rescue me, I’m dead and done for, with not a soul to look to for aid! Oh, how miserable my own heedlessness makes me! Oh! how…

CAIN Essay

A monologue from the play by Lord Byron NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from Lord Byron: Six Plays. Lord Byron. Los Angeles: Black Box Press, 2007. LUCIFER: A superior?! Superior?!No! By heaven, which heHolds, and the abyss, and the immensityOf worlds and life, which I hold with him—No!I have a Victor—true; but no superior.Homage he…

CHOEPHORI or THE LIBATION BEARERS Essay

A monologue from the play by Aeschylus NOTE: This monologue is reprinted from The Dramas of Aeschylus. Trans. Anna Swanwick. London: George Bell and Sons, 1907. NURSE: My mistress bade me summon with all speedÆgisthos to the strangers, that he mayMore clearly learn, as man from man, this taleNewly announced. Before the menial train,She, at…

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Depending on the type of the verbal communication, exist various types of speech. One of the language flow directions is called monologue. This type of speech is one-sided and usually presupposes involvement of one person. A speaker can turn to one person or the whole audience.

Monologues delivery is characterized by a large compositional complexity, requiring the completeness of thought, the strict logical flow of thought and consistency in the statement, strict adherence to grammatical rules. One person acting under conditions of stage isolation delivers the speech. It is pronounced irrespective of replicas of other actors and determining a known moment in the development of action.

There are various types of monologues according to different criteria. Shakespeare monologues are characterized by prevalence, structural isolation, the absence of incomplete sentences in them in the semantic sense; these are replicas contain a description of the actors, information about events occurring, and reflection of events.

One minute monologues are condensed statements. They are usually very informative. These types of speaking are applied to awaken the desire to act or to encourage people to the particular process. They can be either humoristic or serious.

The primary task of classic monologues and the original task is the making the public acquainted with the circumstances of the action, which do not get their reflection on the stage. They tell about the intrusive moments that affect the development of scenic events, and finally depict the experiences of the actors, concentrating action on the personality type.

There are many speeches, which have become famous monologues. To those belong the performances of people who were steeped in history thanks to their specific achievements. To this category also belong speeches of literary characters. Monologues from popular movies also are considered effective, touching and inspirational, as they call to action as well as provoke various emotional responses.

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